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Next time you get a “tumblr/facebook questionnaire” asking you to work out your porn star name or something, remember this…

badwolfbutch:

butchboiblues:

semperfrosty:

Your mother’s maiden name, the name of your first pet, your birthday and the first street you grew up on are usually the same fields used for password security reset questions

Stay Frosty

Fuck y’all. Good looking out

oh my god

(via vsquaredk)

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dynastylnoire:

awwww-cute:

Puppy’s First Hike

I climbed this rock
This my rock

dynastylnoire:

awwww-cute:

Puppy’s First Hike

I climbed this rock

This my rock

(via tinytmas)

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whisperingwanderlust:

thecreatorsproject:

This regenerative candle creates a new candle as it melts. 

This is brilliant
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snh-snh-snh:

I keep thinking oh man, I’m so immature. How am I allowed to be an adult.

Then I spend time with teenagers.

And it’s like, wow, okay, yeah. I am an adult. I am so adult. Look at me adulting all over the place.

(via lostmylionheart)

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"We’re adults, but, like…adult cats. Someone should probably take care of us, but we can sort of make it on our own."

— my roommate, on the question “are we adults” (via disjunct)

(via atypicalanarchy)

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idontfindyouthatinteresting:

sexy-vegan:

Whoa this is actually powerful

Try £60,000… at least. 

idontfindyouthatinteresting:

sexy-vegan:

Whoa this is actually powerful

Try £60,000… at least. 

(Source: particleb0red, via tifftwilbeck)

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rosesandchains:

nayomiejade:

ghettoscenequeen:

youfrenchgreat:

1. This picture of Chicago Christians who showed up at a gay pride parade to apologize for homophobia in the Church.

2. …and the reaction from the parade

21 Pictures That Will Restore Your Faith in Humanity

This is great 

This made me cry. Seriously, I’m weeping a little right now.

Always reblog this :’)

(via getwastedonlife11)

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Why “I Love You” Doesn’t Always Have To Be Spoken Aloud

writingsforwinter:

When my grandmother first said “those” three words to my grandfather,

she said them by tossing a pinch of salt over her shoulder at their wedding.

When I first really said them, they were to myself as an apology

for nineteen years of viewing my body as a wound in need of a tourniquet,

or a grave in need of upheaval. Nineteen years of viewing my body

with the antonym of love and the synonym of dislike.

But when I met the first person I ever slept with, I said those three words

like bruises that would never heal.

They came out like a flock of moths instead of a stomach full of butterflies,

and they burned as they came.

But when he said it back, he said it with his palms

and they returned those three words to me through his fingers.

That was when I learned that scars don’t always have to speak,

that “I love you” doesn’t always have to take the form of words.

Because sometimes to repeat language is to deny it of its meaning,

just as calling all moons in the solar system by the same name

refuses them of the beauty that makes them unique.

My grandmother knew it long before she married my grandfather

and when she finally stepped up to the altar, she knew it then too.

So now when I say “I love you,” I say it in gestures and glances,

but mostly with forgiveness, just like I learned to forgive my body

for nineteen years of being a mistake.

(via writingsforwinter)

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favorite Sara gifs (10/∞)

(Source: ttandsara, via kierstenalexander)

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(Source: aflawedfashion, via jetgirl78)

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"These days, before we talk about misogyny, women are increasingly being asked to modify our language so we don’t hurt men’s feelings. Don’t say, “Men oppress women” – that’s sexism, as bad as any sexism women ever have to handle, possibly worse. Instead, say, “Some men oppress women.” Whatever you do, don’t generalise. That’s something men do. Not all men – just some men.

This type of semantic squabbling is a very effective way of getting women to shut up. After all, most of us grew up learning that being a good girl was all about putting other people’s feelings ahead of our own. We aren’t supposed to say what we think if there’s a chance it might upset somebody else or, worse, make them angry. So we stifle our speech with apologies, caveats and soothing sounds. We reassure our friends and loved ones that “you’re not one of those men who hate women”.

What we don’t say is: of course not all men hate women. But culture hates women, so men who grow up in a sexist culture have a tendency to do and say sexist things, often without meaning to. We aren’t judging you for who you are but that doesn’t mean we’re not asking you to change your behaviour. What you feel about women in your heart is of less immediate importance than how you treat them on a daily basis.

You can be the gentlest, sweetest man in the world yet still benefit from sexism. That’s how oppression works."

Of course all men don’t hate women. But all men must know they benefit from sexism  (via albinwonderland)

(via wo-bist-du)

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icutmyteethonnipplerings:

Patriarchy backfiring on men is not sexism against men.

(via atypicalanarchy)

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weneedtotalkaboutcarson:

vanconcastiel:

sosuperawesome:

Glow in the Dark Solar System Apparel by makeitgoodpdx

SPACE MAKES EVERYTHING BETTER

That girls ass is outta this world.

(via shegavemeasmile)